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NY Times: George Clooney Answers Your Questions About Malaria

February 8, 2011, 5:29 pm

By NICHOLAS KRISTOF

My former travel buddy, George Clooney, caught malaria in January on a trip to Sudan (see what happens when I’m not around to look out for him?). This seemed an opportunity to shine a spotlight on malaria, one of the scourges of much of the developing world, and George agreed to respond to reader questions. Thanks to all for submitting your questions–and I’m truly sorry that the answers were delayed. We were about to post these answers when Egypt intervened and I was too busy dodging pro-Mubarak thugs in Cairo to focus on this. So without further ado, George and I are finally responding.

Nicholas Kristof and George Clooney in Chad in 2009.Nicholas D. Kristof/The New York Times Nicholas Kristof and George Clooney in Chad in 2009.
Q.

I am wondering how Mr Clooney is feeling. I had a friend with malaria who was very, very ill!!
Sue

A.

I’m feeling much better thank you.
— George Clooney

Q.

What side effects did you have? And what were your symptoms when malaria was detected?
Gayle

A.

Not much in side effects, the symptoms are fever, the chills, and exciting adventures in the toilet..weak..really just very bad flu conditions with a little food poisoning thrown in to make you the perfect party guest.
— George Clooney

Q.

Was Mr. Clooney taking any medications for malaria prophylaxis? And if so, how faithfully was he taking them? I hope he visited a travel medicine specialist prior to his trip!
Mo

A.

I don’t know about George, but I wasn’t taking malaria pills when I caught malaria in Congo in 1997. I learned my lesson and now usually take Larium when going to a malarial place in Africa. But some people don’t react well to Larium, and so I sometimes steer others toward Malarone. About five Americans die a year from malaria, usually after travel to the developing world, so it’s worth taking it seriously — and seeking treatment immediately if you develop the symptoms after such a trip.

— Nicholas Kristof

 

Q.

George – A dear friend of mine had malaria…does it recur? And if you’ve had it once, can you get it again?
BrazenMuse

A.

It can…it depends on what type you get..i didn’t get that strain thankfully.
— George Clooney

Q.

George – How did your treatment for malaria differ from the treatment that the average Sudanese would receive?
Joy F.

A.

I had drugs to take before during and after…pills that should be just provided to these people, like a polio vaccine..life saving drugs for diseases that kill millions needlessly, belong to mankind not to companies to profit from….we need another Jonas Salk.
— George Clooney

A.

The average Sudanese in rural areas might not receive any treatment for malaria at all. In rural Africa, any fever is regarded as malaria, and people just suffer and usually recover; there seems to be a certain amount of resistance that builds up among healthy adults. So many people suffer malaria many, many times. Children and pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to dying from it, while healthy adults normally survive, although it can be lethal for them as well.
— Nicholas Kristof

CLICK HERE FOR THE REST OF THE ARTICLE

Dr. Rutledge on Canadian Evening News

Click below to view Dr. Rutledge on the evening news in Canada discussing 3 Billion And Counting:

 

http://www.chbcnews.ca/video/index.html?releasePID=S108148pPi8yLeG0y_QZ1_8c5F_kJQ0S

Dr. Rutledge will be calling in to Jacked In with Jessica Samuels on Tuesday

This just in:

Dr. Rutlege will be calling in to AM1150 this coming Tuesday at 5:20pm (PST) to discuss his documentary 3 Billion And Counting with Jessica Samuels.

To listen live over the internet and for more details visit: www.am1150.ca

Dr. Rutledge calls in as a guest to KSRQ News

Dr. Rutledge was a call in guest tonight to KSRQ News in Minnesota to discuss his new film 3 Billion and Counting. To visit KSRQ News, click here. We will update the site once they have released the audio.

NON-COMMERICAL, EDUCATIONAL RADIO

Pioneer 90.1 is KSRQ-FM , a 24-kilowatt FM radio station licensed by the Federal Communications Commission. KSRQ is owned by Northland Community & Technical College of Thief River Falls, MN.

Insecticidal nets do not always work against diseases transmitted by insect bites

From news-medical.net January 5, 2011:

Longlasting insecticidal nets yielded an important breakthrough in malaria prevention, but this does not automatically mean they always work against diseases transmitted by insect bites. Against the transmission of kala azar disease in India and Nepal they did not have an effect. This was reported by an international group of researchers, led by Marleen Boelaert of the Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp, in the reputed British Medical Journal.

Kala-azar, or visceral leishmaniasis in doctor’s speak, affects half a million people annually. The Leshmania parasite, in fact a group of related parasites, is transmitted by sand flies. The parasite destroys your blood cells, leading to an enlarged spleen, inflammation and progressive wasting. If left untreated, the outcome is fatal.

Until now, in India and Nepal sand flies are controlled by indoor spraying of DDT or other insecticides; some families use classical mosquito nets, which are not treated with longlasting insecticides. Spraying happens local and irregular, which means at any moment sufficient sand flies and prey remain to continue the disease. As an alternative for DDT, a large scale campaign was proposed, providing everyone in a region with a mosquito net treated with insecticide that remains active for several years.

CONTINUE TO ARTICLE

Longlasting insecticidal nets yielded an important breakthrough in malaria prevention, but this does not automatically mean they always work against diseases transmitted by insect bites. Against the transmission of kala azar disease in India and Nepal they did not have an effect. This was reported by an international group of researchers, led by Marleen Boelaert of the Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp, in the reputed British Medical Journal.

Kala-azar, or visceral leishmaniasis in doctor’s speak, affects half a million people annually. The Leshmania parasite, in fact a group of related parasites, is transmitted by sand flies. The parasite destroys your blood cells, leading to an enlarged spleen, inflammation and progressive wasting. If left untreated, the outcome is fatal.

Until now, in India and Nepal sand flies are controlled by indoor spraying of DDT or other insecticides; some families use classical mosquito nets, which are not treated with longlasting insecticides. Spraying happens local and irregular, which means at any moment sufficient sand flies and prey remain to continue the disease. As an alternative for DDT, a large scale campaign was proposed, providing everyone in a region with a mosquito net treated with insecticide that remains active for several years.

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
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